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Coochin Creek day-use area

Tomek.Z.Genek © Queensland Government

Coochin Creek day-use area

Picnic tables No picnic tables
Sheltered picnic tables No sheltered picnic tables
Toilets (non-flush) No toilets
Electric/gas barbecues No barbecues
No lookouts
Dogs allowed on leash No dogs
Wheelchair access (may require assistance) No wheelchair access
Mooring points No mooring points
Anchoring allowed (conditions apply) No anchoring

Legend

Picnic tables No picnic tables
Sheltered picnic tables No sheltered picnic tables
Toilets (non-flush) No toilets
Electric/gas barbecues No barbecues
No lookouts
Dogs allowed on leash No dogs
Wheelchair access (may require assistance) No wheelchair access
Mooring points No mooring points
Anchoring allowed (conditions apply) No anchoring
World Heritage Area
This picnic area is great for fishing, and the mangrove-lined creek is perfect for exploring by canoe or small boat.
Park alerts
Grab a picnic table or spread out a blanket and enjoy a picnic at Coochin Creek day-use area.
Grab a picnic table or spread out a blanket and enjoy a picnic at Coochin Creek day-use area. Tomek.Z.Genek © Queensland Government
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Park Beerburrum
Traditional Owners Traditional Owners
Park Ranger Park Ranger

Spend a relaxing day on the mangrove-lined banks of Coochin Creek. Find yourself a picnic table, fire up one of the barbecues and enjoy the water views and the forests of pink bloodwoods, paperbark tea trees and scribbly gums.

The terraced creek bank is perfect for fishing for bream, flathead and mangrove jack, or for launching your canoe or kayak to go exploring.

Head to the boat ramp one kilometre upstream to launch your small boat and set out into Pumicestone passage in Moreton Bay Marine Park, famed for boating and fishing opportunities. Then sleep under the stars at the popular Coochin Creek camping area.

Getting there and getting around

Coochin Creek day-use area is in Beerburrum and Beerwah state forests on the Sunshine Coast.

By vehicle

  • The day-use area is on the eastern side of the Bruce Highway, with access off Roys Road.
  • If you are travelling north, take the Bells Creek exit and turn right, using the bridge to cross the Bruce Highway. If you are travelling south, turn left at the Bells Creek exit. Turn right into Roys Road and drive about 4km to the turn-off to Coochin Camping Area road.
  • The entrance to the Coochin Creek day-use area is 250m along this unsealed road, on the right.
  • Take care in wet weather. The creek can rise quickly during heavy rainfall, cutting off access along Roys Road.

By boat

  • You can also get to the day-use area by boat, from the Pumicestone Passage.
  • The day-use area is 3km up Coochin Creek from the Pumicestone Passage.
  • Read boat and fish with care for tips on boating and fishing safety and caring for parks.

Road conditions

Parking

You can park at the day-use area.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available at nearby local townships.

  • For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Wheelchair access

There are wheelchair-accessible toilets. Assistance may be required.

When to visit

Opening hours

Coochin Creek day-use area is open 24 hours a day.

Check park alerts for the latest information on access, closures and conditions.

Climate and weather

The Glass House Mountains area has a mild, subtropical climate. In summer, the average daily temperature ranges from 18–28°C and in winter from 11–20°C.

Permits and fees

Organised events

  • If you are planning a school excursion or organising a group event such as a wedding, fun run or adventure training, you may need an organised event permit. Maximum group sizes and other conditions apply depending on location and activity type.

Pets

Domestic animals are not allowed here.

Staying in touch

Mobile phone coverage

Unreliable. Check with your service provider for more information.

Tourism information

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Be prepared

  • Parks are natural environments and conditions can be unpredictable. You are responsible for your own safety and for looking after the park.
  • There are mosquitoes and sandflies at the day-use area.
  • Beware bites and stings.
  • Read stay safe and visit with care for important general information about safety, caring for parks and essentials to bring when you visit Queensland’s national parks.

Open fires

  • Open fires are not allowed.
  • Use the gas barbeques provided or bring a fuel stove for cooking.

Drinking water

  • Untreated tank water is available.
  • Treat all water before use.

Rubbish

  • There are no bins. Take your rubbish with you when you leave.

Boating and fishing

  • The creek and estuary are very shallow and only suitable for very small boats.
  • You can launch and retrieve your boat from the boat ramp, about 1km east of the day-use area.
  • Anchor off from the terraced banks as there are no fixed tie down points.
  • These waterways are tidal, so don't get caught!
  • There is a boat ramp at the end of Roys Road, about 7km east of the day-use area, for deep water access to Pumicestone Passage.
  • The waters adjacent to Beerwah State Forest are in the Moreton Bay Marine Park.
  • If you're heading out on the water make sure you know your zones so you can follow the rules.
  • Fisheries regulations apply. You can obtain information on bag and size limits, restricted species and seasonal closures from Fisheries Queensland.
  • Read boat and fish with care for tips on boating and fishing safety and caring for parks.

Around water

  • Swimming is not recommended. There are no patrolled swimming areas.
  • Sharks are common in the creek and there may also be bullrouts.
  • Read water safety for important information about staying safe in and near water and caring for parks.
Last updated: 22 March 2018
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