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Island Stack

Mark Nemeth © Queensland Government

Island Stack

Walking No Walking
Wheelchair access (may require assistance) No wheelchair access
Mountain biking No mountain biking
Horseriding No horseriding
Two-wheel driving No two-wheel driving
Four-wheel driving No four-wheel driving
Trail-bike riding No trail-bike riding
Canoeing & kayaking No canoeing & kayaking
Boating No boating
Dogs allowed on leash No dogs
Lookout (natural) No lookouts
Tent camping No tent camping

Legend

Walking No walking
Wheelchair access (may require assistance) No wheelchair access
Mountain biking No mountain biking
Horseriding No horseriding
Two-wheel driving No two-wheel driving
Four-wheel driving No four-wheel driving
Trail-bike riding No trail-bike riding
Canoeing & kayaking No canoeing & kayaking
Boating No boating
Dogs allowed on leash No dogs
Lookout (natural) No lookouts
Tent camping No tent camping
World Heritage Area

Experience beautiful panoramas and excellent birdwatching on this steep but rewarding walk to a vantage point in the Middle Gorge.

Park alerts
Enjoy the expansive vistas from the lookout at the top of the plateau.
Enjoy the expansive vistas from the lookout at the top of the plateau. Sarah Jess © Queensland Government
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Park Boodjamulla
Traditional Owners Traditional Owners
Park Ranger Park Ranger

Stretch your legs on a steep climb up the prominent sandstone 'stack' and circle the 'tabletop' of the stack to the capture breath-taking panoramic views from every angle.

Walk in the early morning to watch the sun rise over the island stack, or in the late afternoon as the sun sets and moon rises—witness the orange glow of sandstone walls in the gorge as the light changes. Look for the rare purple-crowned fairy-wren among the creek-side pandanus and, from the top of the stack, watch kites and eagles soaring.

One of the park's eastern walks, this track can be accessed from the Middle Gorge day-use area by crossing the floating bridge.

At a glance

Distance: 4km return (start and finish points are the same and the traveller must return via the same path).
Time suggested: Allow 2hrs walking time.
Grade:
Journey type: Walk

Getting there and getting around

The Island Stack is in Boodjamulla (Lawn Hill) National Park in remote north-west Queensland, close to the Northern Territory border, 270km north-west of Mount Isa.

  • The Island Stack track can be accessed from the car park in the Lawn Hill Gorge section of the park.
  • From the car park walk to the Lawn Hill Gorge Ranger office, follow the Rainbow Serpent track for 100m to the Middle Gorge day-use area.
  • Turn right and walk east following the signs, then cross the floating bridge and continue along the track you reach the trail head for the Island Stack track.
  • The Lawn Hill Gorge section of the park can be accessed from the south via Mount Isa or Camooweal; from the east via Gregory Downs or from the north.

From the south

  • From Mount Isa drive 118km north-west on the Barkly Highway; or, from Camooweal drive 71km east on the Barkly Highway to the Gregory–Burketown sign.
  • Turn right at the Gregory–Burketown sign, and drive 56km north-east on the Thorntonia–Yelvertoft Road.to the Gregory Downs–Camooweal Road (from here the roads are unsealed).
  • Turn right and drive 61km north on the Gregory Downs–Camooweal Road then turn left onto Riversleigh Road and drive 35km north-west to the Riversleigh section of the park at Miyumba camping area, and a further 4km to the Riversleigh fossil trail.
  • Continue travelling 41km north-west to a T-intersection, then turn left and drive 4km west the entrance to the Lawn Hill Gorge section of the park.

Alternative route from Camooweal

  • Drive 2km east on the Barkly Highway then turn left onto the Gregory Downs–Camooweal Road and drive 151km north.
  • Turn left onto Riversleigh Road and drive 35km north-west to the Riversleigh section of the park at Miyumba camping area and a further 4km to the Riversleigh fossil trail.
  • Continue travelling 41km north-west to a T-intersection, then turn left and drive 4km west to the entrance to the Lawn Hill Gorge section of the park.

From Gregory Downs

  • Travel 72km west along Wills Developmental Road then turn south onto Riversleigh Road and drive 21km to the entrance to the Lawn Hill Gorge section of the park.

From the north

  • Several 4WD routes on rough unsealed roads via Hell's Gate or Doomadgee lead to the Lawn Hill Gorge section of the park.

Road conditions

  • Roads in this area are mostly unsealed and not suitable for 2WDs and caravans; the only route suitable for 2WDs and off-road caravans is via Gregory Downs, although we recommend 4WDs.
  • Unsealed roads in the area make access unpredictable. Road surfaces can be rough, with patches of bulldust and corrugations; and sections of roads can also be impassable for extended periods after rain.
  • Road access can be cut during the wet season (October–April) when creek levels rise dramatically within a short time and with little warning. You can become stranded for several days.
  • Check the Burke Shire Council Road Report for up to date road conditions in the area.

Parking

Park in the day-use car park near the Lawn Hill Gorge Ranger office. Limited spaces are available for large vehicles.

Fuel and supplies

  • Fuel and basic supplies are available from Adels Grove, 10km from Lawn Hill Gorge, and at Gregory Downs, 100km east of the park.
  • The nearest major centres offering a full range of supplies and services are Burketown and Mount Isa.

Wheelchair access

There are no wheelchair-accessible facilities.

When to visit

Opening hours

  • Check park alerts for the latest information on access, closures and conditions.

Climate and weather

Boodjamulla (Lawn Hill) National Park has a tropical savannah climate with distinct wet and dry seasons. During the dry season (May–September) the sky is generally clear and humidity is low. Average temperatures in July range from 12–32°C. Nights can be cool with temperatures occasionally falling to single figures overnight. The wet season (October–April) brings heavy rain, high temperatures and high humidity. Average wet season temperatures can range from 30–45°C.

Permits and fees

Organised events

  • If you are planning a school excursion or organising a group event such as a wedding, fun run or adventure training, you may need an organised event permit. Maximum group sizes and other conditions apply depending on location and activity type.

Pets

Domestic animals are not allowed here.

Staying in touch

Mobile phone coverage

Unreliable. Telstra Next G coverage on top of the Island stack Check with your service provider for more information.

Tourism information

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Be prepared

  • Parks are natural environments and conditions can be unpredictable. You are responsible for your own safety and for looking after the park.
  • Read stay safe and visit with care for important general information about safety, caring for parks and essentials to bring when you visit Queensland’s national parks.

Drinking water

  • Treated tap water is provided at the Lawn Hill Gorge ranger office and camping area. Avoid drinking water straight from Lawn Hill Creek—it can make you very thirsty because of the high levels of calcium carbonate.

Rubbish

  • Rubbish bins are not provided. Take your rubbish with you when you leave the park.

Fishing

  • Fishing is prohibited in Lawn Hill Creek.

Walking

  • Due to high temperatures almost all year round, we recommend that you walk only early in the morning and late in the afternoon. It's best to start your walk before 10am or after 5pm (but make sure you leave enough time to finish the walk before it gets dark).
  • Stay clear of cliffs and steep rock faces and take care on uneven track surfaces.
  • Read walk with care for tips on walking safely and walking lightly.

Driving

  • Carry a UHF radio (channels one and six are local repeaters) or satellite phone.
  • Read 4WD with care for important information on 4WD safety and minimal impact driving.
Last updated: 22 March 2018
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