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Mount Norman

© Ben Blanche

Mount Norman

Walking No Walking
Wheelchair access (may require assistance) No wheelchair access
Mountain biking No mountain biking
Horseriding No horseriding
Two-wheel driving No two-wheel driving
Four-wheel driving No four-wheel driving
Trail-bike riding No trail-bike riding
Canoeing & kayaking No canoeing & kayaking
Boating No boating
Dogs allowed on leash No dogs
No lookouts
Tent camping No tent camping

Legend

Walking No walking
Wheelchair access (may require assistance) No wheelchair access
Mountain biking No mountain biking
Horseriding No horseriding
Two-wheel driving No two-wheel driving
Four-wheel driving No four-wheel driving
Trail-bike riding No trail-bike riding
Canoeing & kayaking No canoeing & kayaking
Boating No boating
Dogs allowed on leash No dogs
No lookouts
Tent camping No tent camping
World Heritage Area

Challenge yourself on this trek deep into eucalypt forests, past massive granite outcrops and alongside colourful rock slabs towards Girraween's highest peak.

Park alerts
Mount Norman walk passes through gently sloping open areas dotted with wildflowers in spring.
Mount Norman walk passes through gently sloping open areas dotted with wildflowers in spring. Maxime Coquard © Queensland Government
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Park Girraween
Traditional Owners Traditional Owners
Park Ranger Park Ranger

From the Girraween Visitor Centre, pass Castle Rock, then head deep into the park’s tall eucalypt forests. Encounter rocky ridges, moist gullies blanketed with bracken and gently-sloping open areas sprinkled with wildflowers in spring. Admire views of the Eye of the Needle on Mount Norman's northern face before reaching the rocky slabs at the base of the Mount Norman monolith.

Alternatively, hike 4km from the Mount Norman day-use area through rock gardens and stands of graceful Wallangarra white gums on the mountain’s southern face.

The track does not reach the 1267m summit—the final approach is suitable for rock climbers only.

At a glance

Distance: 11km (or 4km from Mount Norman day-use area) return (start and finish points are the same and the traveller must return via the same path).
Time suggested: Allow 4–5hrs walking time (or 1.5–3hrs return if walking from Mount Norman day-use area).
Grade:
Journey type: Walk

Getting there and getting around

Mount Norman is one of the southern walking tracks in Girraween National Park, located on the Queensland–New South Wales border, 260km south-west of Brisbane.

The track to Mount Norman begins on the southern side of Pyramids Road, near the Girraween Visitor Centre car park. Alternatively you can access the park from Mount Norman day-use area in the south of the park.

There are three access roads (northern, western and southern) to the centre, all accessible by conventional vehicles.

From Brisbane to western entrance

  • Drive about 220km south-west along the New England Highway via Warwick to Stanthorpe.
  • Continue 26km along the New England Highway to Wyberba (30km north of Tenterfield).
  • Turn onto Pyramids Road and follow this winding bitumen road through the Wyberba Valley 6km east to the western park entrance.
  • Drive about 3km on Pyramids Road to the Girraween Visitor Centre.

From Brisbane to northern entrance

  • Drive about 220km south-west along the New England Highway via Warwick to Stanthorpe.
  • Turn onto Sugarloaf Road, which turns into Eukey Road and drive about 15km via Storm King Dam towards Eukey.
  • About 1km before Eukey, turn onto Breens Road, drive 2.5km then turn onto Pyramids Road and drive about 6km to the northern park entrance.
  • Drive about 4km on Pyramids Road to the Girraween Visitor Centre.

From Tenterfield (NSW) to southern entrance

  • Drive 18km north on the New England Highway to Wallangarra.
  • In Wallangarra, cross to the eastern side of the railway line, go over the railway bridge and turn left onto sealed and signposted Mount Norman Road.
  • After about 2km the road changes to gravel. Turn right across a grid and continue for 1km then turn right at the water treatment plant and enter the park's southern entrance.
  • Drive 3.5km on Mount Norman Road to Mount Norman day-use area.

Road conditions

  • Pyramids Road (western entrance) is bitumen from the New England Highway into the park as far as the Girraween Visitor Centre.
  • North of the visitor centre, Pyramids Road is unsealed to the northern park entrance.
  • The roads from Stanthorpe to the northern park entrance via Eukey and Storm King Dam have some gravel sections.
  • See traffic and travel information for road and travel conditions.
  • Check park alerts for the latest information on access, closures and conditions.

Parking

Parking is available at the Bald Rock Creek day-use area nearby, or near the Girraween Visitor Centre. If climbing from the track from the south, park at the Mount Norman day-use area.

Fuel and supplies

The nearest fuel and supplies are available from Stanthorpe (25km from the northern entrance), Ballandean (14km from the western entance) and Wallangarra (4.5km from the southern park entrance).

  • For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Wheelchair access

There are no wheelchair-accessible facilities.

When to visit

Opening hours

Mount Norman is open 24 hours a day.

Check park alerts for the latest information on access, closures and conditions.

Climate and weather

Not far from the Queensland–New South Wales border, Girraween National Park has more in common with cooler southern climes than with the Sunshine State. Crisp winter weather provides skies of blue and picturesque morning frosts. Spring conditions entice an amazing display of wildflowers and wildlife.

Be prepared for cold changes any time. Girraween National Park is pleasantly cool most of the year round. Winters are usually dry and cold with frosty nights reaching an average minimum of -4°C. Summers days are a warm 25–30°C with cooler nights averaging 15–18°C.

Most rain falls between November and March with an average annual rainfall of 850mm per year.

Permits and fees

Organised events

  • If you are planning a school excursion or organising a group event such as a wedding, fun run or adventure training, you may need an organised event permit. Maximum group sizes and other conditions apply depending on location and activity type.

Pets

Domestic animals are not allowed here.

Staying in touch

Mobile phone coverage

None. Check with your service provider for more information.

Tourism information

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Be prepared

  • Parks are natural environments and conditions can be unpredictable. You are responsible for your own safety and for looking after the park.
  • Read stay safe and visit with care for important general information about safety, caring for parks and essentials to bring when you visit Queensland’s national parks.

  • Check park alerts for the latest information on access, closures and conditions.

Drinking water

Rubbish

  • There are no bins. Take your rubbish with you when you leave.

Walking

  • Do not pick the wildflowers. Remember everything in the park (living or dead) is protected—including wildflowers, wildlife, and even rocks and timber.
  • Keep to designated walking tracks. They lead you to the more outstanding features without damaging the park.
  • Be very careful in rainy and windy conditions—granite rocks become extremely slippery when wet.
  • Choose walks that suit the capabilities of your entire group.
  • You need a topographic map when walking remote tracks.
  • Read walk with care for tips on walking safely and walking lightly.

Around water

  • Never dive or jump into Bald Rock Creek. The water flow varies and submerged rocks and logs are dangerous.
  • Do not use soap and detergent in Girraween National Park's creek and waterholes—they pollute the water.
  • Read water safety for important information about staying safe in and near water and caring for parks.

Last updated: 22 March 2018
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