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South Macushla camping area

Emma Schmidt © Queensland Government

South Macushla camping area

Tent camping No tent camping
Caravan camping No caravan camping
Campervan camping No campervan camping
Motorhome camping No motorhome camping
Camper trailer camping No camper trailer camping
Toilets (non-flush) No toilets
No showers
Camp fires allowed (conditions apply) No camp fires
No barbecues
Generators allowed (conditions apply) No generators
Picnic tables No picnic tables
Dogs allowed on leash No dogs
Wheelchair access (may require assistance) No wheelchair access
World Heritage Area

Legend

Tent camping No tent camping
Caravan camping No caravan camping
Campervan camping No campervan camping
Motorhome camping No motorhome camping
Camper trailer camping No camper trailer camping
Toilets (non-flush) No toilets
No showers
Camp fires allowed (conditions apply) No camp fires
No barbecues
Generators allowed (conditions apply) No generators
Picnic tables No picnic tables
Dogs allowed on leash No dogs
Wheelchair access (may require assistance) No wheelchair access
World Heritage Area

For boat camping at its best, set up in this shady beach-side camping area and explore the island and surrounding waters.

There's a non-flush toilet at South Macushla camping area.
There's a non-flush toilet at South Macushla camping area. Emma Schmidt © Queensland Government
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Park Hinchinbrook
Traditional Owners Traditional Owners
Park Ranger Park Ranger

At the island's northern end, on sheltered Missionary Bay, this beach-side camping area can be your Hinchinbrook home-away-from-home.

Set up camp under the trees and head off to explore the beach, or grab your pack and discover the highlights of the North Shepherd Bay and South Shepherd Bay tracks. They start from the nearby North Macushla camping area.

Out on the water, investigate the coastline and the labyrinth of waterways that spill into the bay. It’s great fishing so make sure you bring all your gear.

Back at camp, keep an eye out for goannas that often swagger through the sites.

This island park is part of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area, famed for its superlative natural beauty, outstanding examples of reef ecosystem development, evolutionary history and amazing diversity.

At a glance

Camping layout: Open area without defined sites
Site surface: Sand and grass.
Camp sites are suitable for: Short walk to tent
Facilities: picnic tables
Permits and fees: camping permits

Getting there and getting around

South Macushla camping area is in Hinchinbrook Island National Park, 8km off the Queensland coast at Cardwell.

  • The camping area can be reached by private vessel launched from Cardwell or Lucinda, or by sea kayak.

Private vessel

  • Visitors accessing the island by private vessel should obtain a copy of the Hinchinbrook Marine Wonders brochure for information on transit lanes and boat speeds to aid dugong and turtle conservation.
  • Access to some areas of Hinchinbrook Island is weather and tide dependent and a good knowledge of the waters and potential hazards is essential.

Sea kayak

  • Commercial sea kayak tours of Hinchinbrook Island are available.
  • For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Road conditions

The Bruce Highway to Cardwell and Lucinda is accessible by conventional vehicles.

Fuel and supplies

Hinchinbrook Island is remote and isolated. Visitors should be well prepared and self-sufficient before setting off from the mainland. Fuel and supplies are available at Cardwell and Lucinda.

  • For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Wheelchair access

There are no wheelchair-accessible facilities.

When to visit

Opening hours

South Macushla camping area is open 24 hours a day. Check-in to your camp after 2pm and check-out by 11am on the day of departure.

Check park alerts for the latest information on access, closures and conditions.

Climate and weather

Hinchinbrook Island National Park has a mild subtropical climate. Daytime temperatures and humidity can be high at any time of the year and nights can be very cool. The cooler months of the year, from April to September, are the best times to visit. Please carry suitable clothing to accommodate all temperature extremes.

Permits and fees

Camping permits

If you can’t book online, book over the counter or at a self-service kiosk.

Organised events

  • If you are planning a school excursion or organising a group event such as a wedding, fun run or adventure training, you may need an organised event permit. Maximum group sizes and other conditions apply depending on location and activity type.

Pets

Domestic animals are not allowed here.

Staying in touch

Mobile phone coverage

Generally available. Check with your service provider for more information.

Tourism information

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Be prepared

  • Parks are natural environments and conditions can be unpredictable. You are responsible for your own safety and for looking after the park.
  • Hinchinbrook Island is remote and isolated. You need to plan ahead carefully to ensure you have a safe and enjoyable visit.
  • Leave your travel details with a responsible person. Let them know your plans and contact them on your return. Have a contingency plan in place if you fail to contact them by the agreed time. If you change your plans, inform them.
  • Read stay safe and visit with care for important general information about safety, caring for parks and essentials to bring when you visit Queensland’s national parks.

Camping

  • Please remain behind the temporary crocodile barriers at all times.
  • Bring insect repellent and clothing to avoid insect bites; biodegradable toilet paper and hand trowel, lightweight sleeping bag and a high quality, lightweight and waterproof tent.
  • Make sure you don't transport pests in your gear or clothing onto or around the island. Our national parks, including our precious Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area islands, need your help to remain pest‑free.
  • Read camp with care for tips on camping safely and camping softly.

Open fires

  • Open fires are not allowed.
  • Bring a gas or liquid fuel stove for cooking.

Drinking water

  • There is no drinking water provided in the park. You need to bring enough water for the duration of your stay.
  • Treat all water before use.

Rubbish

  • There are no bins. Take your rubbish with you when you leave.

Walking

  • Creek beds and rock surfaces can be slippery. Take care when crossing these surfaces.
  • Avoid bites from sandflies and mosquitoes. Beware bites and stings.
  • Make sure you don't transport pests in your gear or clothing onto or around the island. Our national parks, including our precious Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area islands, need your help to remain pest‑free.
  • Estuarine crocodiles live in this area, including on the beaches, in the ocean and in tidal areas such as creeks and mangrove areas. Crocodiles are dangerous and attacks can be fatal. Be croc-wise in croc country.
  • Read walk with care for tips on walking safely and walking lightly.

Boating and fishing

  • Before you set out, first obtain a copy of the Hinchinbrook Marine Wonders brochure for information on transit lanes and boat speeds to aid dugong and turtle conservation.
  • Access to some areas of Hinchinbrook Island is weather and tide dependent and a good knowledge of the waters and potential hazards is essential.
  • Check local tide tables and weather conditions at the Bureau of Meteorology before you set out.
  • The waters adjacent to Hinchinbrook Island National Park are in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and Great Barrier Reef Coast Marine Park.
  • Before heading out on the water make sure you have a zoning map, know the zones and what's allowed there.
  • Voluntary vessel transit lanes and boat speeds are in place around Hinchinbrook Island to help protect the island's marine animals and their homes. Please use these vessel transit lanes and abide by the recommended vessel speeds.
  • Fishing is not permitted in the freshwater areas of the national park or in Channel Nine in Missionary Bay.
  • Fisheries regulations apply. You can obtain information on bag and size limits, restricted species and seasonal closures from Fisheries Queensland.
  • Fishing is not permitted in the freshwater areas of the national park or in Creek Nine in Missionary Bay.
  • Dangerous stinging jellyfish ('stingers') may be present in the waters surrounding Hinchinbrook Island at any time, but occur more frequently in the warmer months. Beware marine stingers.
  • Estuarine crocodiles live in this area, including on the beaches, in the ocean and in tidal areas such as creeks and mangrove areas. Crocodiles are dangerous and attacks can be fatal. Be croc-wise in croc country.
  • Read boat and fish with care for tips on boating and fishing safety and caring for parks.

Around water

  • Dangerous stinging jellyfish ('stingers') may be present in the waters surrounding Hinchinbrook Island at any time, but occur more frequently in the warmer months. Beware marine stingers.
  • Estuarine crocodiles live in this area, including on the beaches, in the ocean and in tidal areas such as creeks and mangrove areas. Crocodiles are dangerous and attacks can be fatal. Be croc-wise in croc country.
  • Read water safety for important information about staying safe in and near water and caring for parks.

Emergency

  • Carry at least one form of communication equipment. Satellite phones and Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs) are the most effective.
  • Mobile phone coverage is unreliable. If you do have access to a mobile network during an emergency dial Triple Zero (000) or 112. Otherwise, send help to the nearest bay or coastal location to alert a passing or anchored vessel.
  • Emergency calls via marine radio, on VHF channel 16, should be made to the Australian Volunteer Coast Guard Association at Ingham for the southern end of the island (call sign VMR414), at Cardwell for the northern end of the island (call sign VMR423), or Townsville if the local stations are not responding (call sign VMR408).

Last updated: 22 March 2018
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