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Mount Hobwee circuit

© Lesley Hutley

Mount Hobwee circuit

Walking No Walking
Wheelchair access (may require assistance) No wheelchair access
Mountain biking No mountain biking
Horseriding No horseriding
Two-wheel driving No two-wheel driving
Four-wheel driving No four-wheel driving
Trail-bike riding No trail-bike riding
Canoeing & kayaking No canoeing & kayaking
Boating No boating
Dogs allowed on leash No dogs
Lookout (natural) No lookouts
Tent camping No tent camping
World Heritage Area

Legend

Walking No walking
Wheelchair access (may require assistance) No wheelchair access
Mountain biking No mountain biking
Horseriding No horseriding
Two-wheel driving No two-wheel driving
Four-wheel driving No four-wheel driving
Trail-bike riding No trail-bike riding
Canoeing & kayaking No canoeing & kayaking
Boating No boating
Dogs allowed on leash No dogs
Lookout (natural) No lookouts
Tent camping No tent camping
World Heritage Area

Spend the day hiking through picturesque rainforest to the Antarctic beech-clad summit of Mount Hobwee.

Park alerts
Hike to the summit of Mount Hobwee.
Hike to the summit of Mount Hobwee. © Lesley Hutley
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Park Lamington
Traditional Owners Traditional Owners
Park Ranger Park Ranger

From the Border track, wind up through rainforest on a track flanked by abundant stream lilies. Stop for a break at Darrayabroo lookout and drink in the amazing views along the McPherson Ranges towards Bithongabel. Onwards and upwards through an Arctic beech forest that was severely damaged in a storm in 1983 you’ll soon arrive at the summit.

On the way back, look for clusters of beech oranges—the fruiting body of a fungus that is only found on Antarctic beech in Australia and South America. The skin of the fruit bursts and uncovers a honeycomb-like network of cavities.

This park is part of the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area, famed for its ongoing geological processes, evolutionary history, and diversity (especially of rare, threatened and endemic species).

At a glance

Distance: 18.2km circuit (the same start and finish point, but the traveller doesn’t return along the same path).
Time suggested: Allow 8hrs walking time.
Grade:
Journey type: Walk

Getting there and getting around

The Mount Hobwee circuit is in the Binna Burra section of Lamington National Park, 110km south of Brisbane.

Getting to Lamington

The park has two sections—Green Mountains and Binna Burra. The Green Mountains section is on the western side of the Lamington Plateau in an area called O'Reilly. The Binna Burra section encompasses the rest of the park to the east. There is no public transport to the park.

Binna Burra section

  • From Nerang take State Route 90 (Beaudesert-Nerang Road) and follow it for 5.3km.
  • Continue along the same road as it changes into State Route 97 (Nerang-Murwillumbah Road).
  • Drive for 2.8 km and turn right onto Beechmont Road.
  • Follow Beechmont Road for 18.3km.
  • At Beechmont, follow the road through the roundabout and onto Binna Burra Road.
  • Follow the road for 10km to the Binna Burra section park entrance.

For a slightly less winding route to the Binna Burra section

  • From Nerang take State Route 90 (Beaudesert-Nerang Road) and follow it for 26.4km.
  • Turn left onto Beachmont Road and follow it for 14.2km.
  • At Beechmont, turn right at the roundabout and follow Binna Burra Road for 10km to the Binna Burra section park entrance.

Road conditions

  • The final section of the road from Beechmont is very narrow.
  • You need to turn on your headlights if travelling early in the morning, and when visibility is poor.

Parking

You can park your car at the Binna Burra upper day-use area.

Fuel and supplies

You can get fuel and supplies at Canungra and Nerang.

Wheelchair access

There are no wheelchair-accessible facilities.

When to visit

Opening hours

Mount Hobwee circuit is open 24 hours a day.

Check park alerts for the latest information on access, closures and conditions.

Climate and weather

Lamington National Park has a subtropical climate and is generally 5°C cooler than Brisbane. Extreme winter temperatures can fall below 0°C and frosts can occur. An average of 1600mm of rain falls each year, mostly during the wet season between November and March. The best time to visit is during winter when the drier weather makes views less hazy and the leeches less prevalent.

Permits and fees

Organised events

  • If you are planning a school excursion or organising a group event such as a wedding, fun run or adventure training, you may need an organised event permit. Maximum group sizes and other conditions apply depending on location and activity type.

Pets

Domestic animals are not allowed here.

Staying in touch

Mobile phone coverage

Unreliable. Check with your service provider for more information.

Tourism information

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Be prepared

  • Parks are natural environments and conditions can be unpredictable. You are responsible for your own safety and for looking after the park.
  • Ensure you have warm clothing and wet weather protection as conditions can change rapidly and without warning.
  • The park is popular with day visitors and can be very crowded, especially on weekends and public holidays. We recommend you bring your own seating and a fuel stove.
  • Take care to avoid contact with stinging trees.
  • Beware bites and stings.
  • Read stay safe and visit with care for important general information about safety, caring for parks and essentials to bring when you visit Queensland’s national parks.

Open fires

  • Open fires are not allowed.

Rubbish

  • There are no bins. Take your rubbish with you when you leave.

Drinking water

  • You need to bring your own drinking water.

Walking

  • Take care when walking beside the bitumen road especially on busy weekends.
  • Always tell someone where you are going and when you expect to return.
  • You need to be familiar with the walking track classification system.
  • The extremely rugged mountain terrain can be hazardous for inexperienced or poorly prepared walkers.
  • If you're not sure about your skills and abilities, we recommend that you contact a bushwalking club and join one of their organised walks.
  • You can get guidebooks from specialist camping stores and some bookshops.
  • We recommend you also use a 1:25,000 topographic map.
  • It's best to only walk in the remote areas of the park during the cooler months—usually April to September.
  • When bush toileting, move well away from camp sites, walking tracks and creeks, and use a trowel to bury waste at least 15cm deep. Bag all personal hygiene products and take them away for appropriate disposal in rubbish bins.
  • When walking in the remoter sections of the park, we recommend you carry a personal locator beacon (PLB) or similar device.
  • Watch Stop the spread of weeds and pathogens and always use pathogen control stations (see locations on the Binna Burra section map (PDF, 813.8KB) and the Green Mountains section map (PDF, 467.5KB) ).

Around water

  • To protect yourself and the environment, we recommend that you stay out of the creeks and waterholes, and away from waterfalls. Serious injuries have occured here.
  • Look out for eels as they may give you a quick, sharp bite.

  • Read water safety for important information about staying safe in and near water and caring for parks.
Last updated: 22 March 2018
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