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Rous Battery track

Leanne Siebuhr © Queensland Government

Rous Battery track

Walking No Walking
Wheelchair access (may require assistance) No wheelchair access
Mountain biking No mountain biking
Horseriding No horseriding
Two-wheel driving No two-wheel driving
Four-wheel driving No four-wheel driving
Trail-bike riding No trail-bike riding
Canoeing & kayaking No canoeing & kayaking
Boating No boating
Dogs allowed on leash No dogs
No lookouts
Tent camping No tent camping

Legend

Walking No walking
Wheelchair access (may require assistance) No wheelchair access
Mountain biking No mountain biking
Horseriding No horseriding
Two-wheel driving No two-wheel driving
Four-wheel driving No four-wheel driving
Trail-bike riding No trail-bike riding
Canoeing & kayaking No canoeing & kayaking
Boating No boating
Dogs allowed on leash No dogs
No lookouts
Tent camping No tent camping
World Heritage Area

Step back in time and discover the remains of a World War II fort set high on the islands dunes.

Park alerts

Moreton Island conditions report

Critical information for your safety is included in the conditions report, always check it before you visit.

The northern entrance to the Rous Battery track.
The northern entrance to the Rous Battery track. Leanne Siebuhr © Queensland Government
View map
Park Moreton
Traditional Owners Traditional Owners
Park Ranger Park Ranger

Wander through native forest along a road built by the Civil Construction Corps during World War II.

Imagine a time when this track was used to move troops, supplies and heavy guns between the Cowan Cowan and Rous Battery artillery.

Walk through native scribbly gum forest and feathery foxtails—look for traces of bandicoot diggings in the sandy ground below your feet.

Venture down one of the smaller trails branching off the main track to the World War II Rous Battery buildings perched on the dunes. Explore the remnants of a fort and artillery batteries and admire spectacular views over the eastern beach.

At a glance

Distance: 9.8km one way (a path where the start point is different to the finish point).
Time suggested: Allow 3.5hrs walking time.
Grade:
Journey type: Walk

Getting there and getting around

Rous Battery track is in Moreton Island National Park, 40km offshore from Brisbane. The island can be reached by ferry, barge or boat.

The Rous Battery track starts off The Desert Road and ends at Rous Battery on the eastern beach.

You will need a 4WD for driving on the island. Four-wheel-drives with high clearance and low range function are strongly recommended. All-wheel-drive vehicles without true 4WD function and vehicles with low clearance will have difficulty along inland tracks and in soft sand, therefore we don't recommend them for Moreton Island.

  • Follow the Tangalooma Bypass Road and The Desert Road to the start of the track.
  • The track extends south following undulating ridge lines for 9.8km, ending at the eastern beach near Rous Battery.
  • Stay overnight in one of two camp sites at the end of the track in the South-east camping zone, then return the next day.
  • Alternatively you can start from the eastern beach at Rous Battery and walk to The Desert and western beach.
  • If you are short of time, drive south on the eastern beach past Middle Road to Rous Battery and spend an hour exploring the fort remnants.
  • Remember all vehicles must be registered, drivers must be licensed and all Queensland road rules apply, even on beaches.
  • A vehicle access permit must be purchased. Display the permit on your windscreen before driving in the recreation area.
  • Read 4WD with care for important information on 4WD safety and minimal impact driving.

Getting to Moreton Island

Barge and ferry access

Barges and ferries for vehicles and passengers run daily. Extra services operate in school holidays and on long weekends. Bookings are essential.

  • For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Private boat access

Moreton Island lies in exposed waters—you may encounter large seas between Moreton Island and the mainland. Consider your experience and the suitability of your vessel, and take into account currents and predicted weather and sea conditions when planning your trip.

  • Be aware that there are no public moorings available at Moreton Island.
  • When anchoring, make sure that your vessel, anchors and ropes don't restrict the safe movement of 4WDs or pedestrians on the beach.

Road conditions

  • Eastern Beach is best driven 2hrs either side of low tide. Exposed rocks can make this section on beach impassable at times.
  • The speed limit on inland tracks is 30km/hr and 60km/hr on the beach unless otherwise signed.
  • Check the Moreton Island conditions report for the latest information on access, closures and conditions within the recreation area.

  • Check park alerts for the latest information on access, closures and conditions.

Parking

Parking is available at The Desert car park at the northern end of the track and near the water point at Rous Battery on the eastern beach.

Fuel and supplies

Visitors will need to ensure they carry adequate supplies of fuel from Brisbane. Please note that vehicle access permits are issued with a condition that restricts the amount of fuel that may be kept within a developed camping area to 50L.

General supplies are available at a few locations on Moreton Island.

Wheelchair access

There are no wheelchair-accessible facilities.

When to visit

Opening hours

Rous Battery track is open 24 hours a day.

Check park alerts for the latest information on access, closures and conditions.

Climate and weather

Moreton Island has a mild, subtropical climate. The average daily temperature range is 22–30°C in summer and 12–22°C in winter.

Permits and fees

Vehicle access permits

  • A vehicle access permit must be purchased. Display the permit on your windscreen before driving in the recreation area.

Organised events

  • If you are planning a school excursion or organising a group event such as a wedding, fun run or adventure training, you may need an organised event permit. Maximum group sizes and other conditions apply depending on location and activity type.

Pets

Domestic animals are not allowed here.

Staying in touch

Mobile phone coverage

Unreliable. Check with your service provider for more information.

Tourism information

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Be prepared

  • Parks are natural environments and conditions can be unpredictable. You are responsible for your own safety and for looking after the park.
  • Read stay safe and visit with care for important general information about safety, caring for parks and essentials to bring when you visit Queensland’s national parks.

Drinking water

  • You can collect bore water at Rous Battery near the eastern beach.
  • Treat all water before use.

Rubbish

  • There are no bins provided. You can use rubbish bins located near The Wrecks and Comboyuro Point camping areas.
  • Transport your rubbish in sturdy containers or bags secured inside your vehicle when driving. Don't carry rubbish bags on your bull bar as these tend to break and spread rubbish across the island's tracks.

Walking

  • This long track is best walked in winter and spring, or in the early morning during summer.
  • During very high fire danger the track may be closed.
  • Consider carrying a personal locator beacon on this remote walk.
  • Read walk with care for tips on walking safely and walking lightly.

Driving

  • Park and play well away from sand cliffs as they can collapse without warning.
  • Moreton Island's beaches have hazards including washouts and exposed rocks, particularly after heavy rain and rough seas.
  • Vehicle crashes have been caused by reckless driving and pranks, and passengers have suffered serious spinal injuries in vehicles travelling too fast for the road or beach conditions.
  • Read 4WD with care for important information on 4WD safety and minimal impact driving.
Last updated: 22 March 2018
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