Noosa National Park

Maxime Coquard © Tourism and Events Queensland

Noosa National Park

Experience a feast for the senses, exploring rainforest, picture-perfect beaches, breathtaking ocean vistas and an iconic coastline of rugged headlands.

Sunset view from Laguna Bay in Noosa National Park.
Sunset view from Laguna Bay in Noosa National Park. © James Haak
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Park Noosa
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Park Ranger Park Ranger

Nestled on the doorstep of the famous tourist town of Noosa, this popular park features some of South East Queensland's most picturesque scenery.

Discover secluded beaches, rugged coastal features and views from the iconic headland at Noosa Heads. Spot dolphins frolicking in the ocean at Boiling Pot and Dolphin Point, and be thrilled as thunderous waves crash into the rocks below Hell's Gates.

Wind through lush rainforest, fragrant open woodlands and heathlands exploring 15km of walking tracks, ranging from easy to moderate. Walk along clifftops boasting unforgettable coastal views before leaving your footprints behind on pristine sandy beaches.

Many of the tracks start and end at Noosa Headland day-use area in the Headland section. With its peaceful shaded areas and ocean backdrop, this is a wonderful spot to enjoy a picnic or barbecue with family and friends.

Venture to Peregian and Emu Mountain sections and encounter coastal lowlands extending south towards Coolum Beach. Meander through paperbark swamps, she-oak forests and heath, brimming with vivid wildflowers in winter and spring. Walk to the summit of Emu Mountain for panoramic views of the coast.

Keep your eyes peeled for a diverse range of wildlife that live in the park, from sleepy koalas perched on branches to glossy black-cockatoos squawking overhead.

Keep discovering

Top things to see and do

Meander through rainforest and eucalypt woodlands to northern Alexandria Bay on the Tanglewood Walk.

Noosa's journeys

See Noosa's walks.

Soak up a splendid sunset from Laguna Lookout in Noosa National Park.

Noosa's attractions

See Noosa's day-use area and lookout.

Getting there and getting around

Noosa National Park is nestled between Noosa Heads and Coolum Beach, on the Sunshine Coast, 160km north of Brisbane. The national park is comprised of a number of sections.

The national park is accessible by sealed roads suitable for conventional 2WDs. Parking is limited so visitors are encouraged to walk, ride or catch the bus (see TransLink) during peak periods.

Headland section

Access Noosa Headland day-use area and walks at the end of Park Road in Noosa Heads:

  • Drive to the day-use area car park.
  • Walk 1km along the scenic seaside boardwalk from Hastings Street (or 1.1km from the bus stop).
  • Cycle with caution along Park Road. Bike racks are provided in the day-use area (bring own padlock).

Access Laguna Lookout at the end of Viewland Drive in Noosa Heads:

  • Walk 1.2km up a very steep hill in Noosa council’s Yanaman Bushland Reserve from Hastings Street (or 1.3km from the bus stop). This walk has many steps and is not suitable for wheelchairs.
  • Cycle along council shared pathways outside the national park, then cycle with caution along the very steep hill on Viewland Drive.
  • Drive 1.3km to the end of Viewland Drive.

Access Alexandria Bay Walk from Parkedge Road in Sunshine Beach:

  • Walk 150m from the bus stop on Solway Drive (near Surf Street) to the start of the walking track.
  • Cycle along council shared pathways outside the national park. Please note, there are no bike racks available.
  • Drive to Parkedge Road (limited street parking).

Access the remote section of the Coastal Walk at Sunshine Beach:

  • Park at council car parks located on Belmore Terrace or Seaview Drive. Walk the beach access tracks, turn north and walk along the public beach (up to 1km).
  • Walk from the bus stop on Duke Street and take beach access track 32 (at the Sunshine Beach Surf Lifesaving Club). Turn north and walk along the public beach (1.3km)

Peregian and Emu Mountain sections

Access the Ocean Beach Walk from the David Low Way, in Coolum Beach:

  • From the bus stop on David Low Way (Coolum State High School), walk 600m south to the car park and the start of the walk.
  • Cycle along council shared pathways outside the national park. Please note, there are no bike racks available.
  • Drive 3km north of Coolum Beach township, or 3km south of Peregian Beach township, on the David Low Way.

Access Emu Mountain Summit walk and Hakea Walk from Havana Road East, in Coolum Beach:

  • From the bus stop on David Low Way (Coolum Beach State High School), walk down Havana Road East 400m to Emu Mountain Summit Walk or 600m to Hakea Walk. Walkers may exit the Hakea Walk at Tritonia Drive and walk an additional 600m to the Tritonia Drive bus stop on David Low Way.
  • Cycle along council shared pathways outside the national park. Please note, there are no bike racks available.
  • Drive 3.5km north of Coolum Beach township, or 2.5km south of Peregian Beach township, on the David Low Way. Turn onto Havana Road East.

Road conditions

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available in Noosa Heads and nearby towns.

  • For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Wheelchair access

In the Headland section of the park, the first 1.2km of the Coastal Walk, from Noosa Headland day-use area to Dolphin Point, is paved and suitable for assisted wheelchairs and strollers.

Wheelchair-accessible toilets are located at Noosa Headland day-use area and at Tea Tree Bay along the Coastal Walk.

Guided tours and talks

You can take guided tours on the island offered by commercial tourism operators.

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Walking

Explore Noosa National Park via a network of walking tracks that range from easy to moderate. Tracks wind along the coast, through rainforest and open woodlands and across colourful wallum heath and sedgelands, where a great variety of wildflowers can be seen in winter and spring.

Map of walking tracks

Picnicking

Enjoy a picnic at Noosa Headland day-use area overlooking the ocean with its sweeping views north to Cooloola Recreation Area.

Viewing wildlife

Get up early or stay until dusk for the best chance of seeing wildlife in Noosa National Park.

  • Keep a look out for lace monitors, koalas, brush-turkeys, kookaburras, figbirds and rainbow lorikeets along the many walking tracks and in Noosa Headland day-use area.
  • Watch migrating humpback whales from the coastline between June and November. The best spots to see whales, turtles and dolphins are Dolphin Point and Hell's Gates along the Coastal Walk in the Headland section.
  • Read more about the park's natural environment.

Swimming

There are no patrolled beaches in Noosa National Park. Swimming outside of patrolled beaches is not recommended as people have suffered serious injuries and deaths.

  • Strong currents and surf are particularly dangerous at Alexandria Bay.
  • Swim at patrolled beaches during operating hours at Noosa Heads (adjacent to Hastings Street) or Sunshine Beach.
  • Be aware that sharks are common in the ocean and bluebottles (a species of marine stinger) are prevalent during northerly winds.
  • Read water safety for important information about staying safe in and near water and caring for parks.

Fishing

The beaches on the Ocean Beach Walk are the only safe place to fish from in Noosa National Park.

  • The rocky shoreline in the Headland section can be dangerous. Waves have swept fishermen into the ocean and onto rocks, causing serious injuries.
  • Outside the park, you can safely fish from Noosa Heads and Sunshine Beach.
  • Fisheries regulations apply. You can obtain information on bag and size limits, restricted species and seasonal closures from Fisheries Queensland.
  • Read more about fishing with care in Noosa National Park.

When to visit

Opening hours

Noosa National Park is open 24 hours a day.

Check park alerts for the latest information on access, closures and conditions.

Climate and weather

Noosa National Park has a mild, subtropical climate. The daily average temperature range is 21–29°C in summer and 10–21°C in winter.

Permits and fees

Organised events

  • If you are planning a school excursion or organising a group event such as a wedding, fun run or adventure training, you may need an organised event permit. Maximum group sizes and other conditions apply depending on location and activity type.

Pets

Domestic animals are not allowed here.

Staying in touch

Mobile phone coverage

Unreliable. Emergency radios are located at the northern entrance to Alexandria Bay on the Coastal Walk and on the Alexandria Bay Walk where it joins the beach. Mobile phone reception is generally available at Emu Mountain and Peregian sections. Check with your service provider for more information. Save the app that can save your life. The free-to-download Emergency+ app uses GPS functionality built into smart phones for the caller to provide critical location details required to mobilise emergency services. Check with your service provider for more information.

Tourism information

Brochure

Download this brochure and take it with you:

Information provided in this guide is correct at the time of printing. Check park alerts for the latest details.

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Be prepared

  • Parks are natural environments and conditions can be unpredictable. You are responsible for your own safety and for looking after the park.
  • Take care of your property. Do not leave valuables in parked cars.
  • Read stay safe and visit with care for important general information about safety, caring for parks and essentials to bring when you visit Queensland’s national parks.

  • Check park alerts for the latest information on access, closures and conditions.

Open fires

Rubbish

Drinking water

Walking

  • Always walk with a group or in sight of another group and walk in daylight hours only. There have been serious assaults in this park.
  • Stay on the track and away from cliff edges.
  • Everyone moves at different paces—leave greater space around elderly, disabled and young people.
  • You can't use bicycles, scooters, skateboards or rollerblades on the walking tracks or roads in the park.
  • Be careful to avoid collisions—leave larger gaps between you and others, especially when carrying larger gear or moving quickly. Carry surfboards with fins turned in, slow down for narrow sections and alert others before passing.
  • Remember that walkers have right of way on walking tracks.
  • Read walk with care for tips on walking safely and walking lightly.

Around water

  • Strong currents and surf are particularly dangerous at Alexandria Bay.
  • Swim at patrolled beaches during operating hours at Noosa Heads (adjacent to Hastings Street) or Sunshine Beach.
  • Swimming outside of patrolled beaches is not recommended as people have suffered serious injuries and deaths.
  • Be aware that sharks are common in the ocean and bluebottles (a species of marine stinger) are prevalent during northerly winds.
  • Read water safety for important information about staying safe in and near water and caring for parks.

Fishing

  • The rocky shoreline in the Headland section can be dangerous. Waves have swept fishermen into the ocean and onto rocks, causing serious injuries.
  • Bury offal, scales and unused bait 50cm deep and just below the high tide line.
  • Within the park, you can safely fish from the beaches on the Ocean Beach Walk or outside the park at Noosa Heads and Sunshine Beach.
  • Read boat and fish with care for tips on boating and fishing safety and caring for parks.

Natural environment

Noosa National Park conserves a near-continuous belt of natural coastal vegetation communities along the Sunshine Coast, from Coolum in the south to Noosa Heads in the north.

The park protects a diversity of native plants and animals including vulnerable and endangered species such as the glossy black-cockatoo, ground parrot, koala, red goshawk, wallum froglet, swamp orchid and Christmas bells.

The park's mosaic of distinct coastline landforms encompasses spectacular rocky headlands, high dunes, foredunes, hills and coastal sand plains supporting tea-tree swamp and wallum heaths.

Remnant coastal lowland rainforests are found in moist gullies and on sheltered slopes away from the sea breezes. Hoop and kauri pines tower above these small rainforest pockets.

Open woodlands with a heath understorey and low wallum heath cover most of the park. The heathlands provide impressive wildflower displays during winter and spring.

Request a species list to see what plants and animals have been recorded here.

Culture and history

Originally declared in 1939, Noosa National Park is now one of the principal attractions of the Sunshine Coast. Its impressive coastal views, rocky headlands, sandy shorelines and recreational opportunities attract more than one and a half million visitors each year.

Many of the landscapes and places that are protected within the park have spiritual, cultural and historical significance for Aboriginal people.

The non-Aboriginal history of the park includes logging of hoop pines during the early twentieth century, and World War II trenches built as a series of fortifications along the Sunshine Coast.

Last updated: 08 September 2017
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