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Ooline Creek track

Brett Roberts © Queensland Government

Ooline Creek track

Walking No Walking
Wheelchair access (may require assistance) No wheelchair access
Mountain biking No mountain biking
Horseriding No horseriding
Two-wheel driving No two-wheel driving
Four-wheel driving No four-wheel driving
Trail-bike riding No trail-bike riding
Canoeing & kayaking No canoeing & kayaking
Boating No boating
Dogs allowed on leash No dogs
No lookouts
Tent camping No tent camping

Legend

Walking No walking
Wheelchair access (may require assistance) No wheelchair access
Mountain biking No mountain biking
Horseriding No horseriding
Two-wheel driving No two-wheel driving
Four-wheel driving No four-wheel driving
Trail-bike riding No trail-bike riding
Canoeing & kayaking No canoeing & kayaking
Boating No boating
Dogs allowed on leash No dogs
No lookouts
Tent camping No tent camping
World Heritage Area

Trace your fingers across steep rock faces, through a sheltered gorge with rock pools and vine scrub where vulnerable ooline trees grow.

Park alerts
Ooline Creek has delightful rock pools to be discovered on the Ooline Creek track.
Ooline Creek has delightful rock pools to be discovered on the Ooline Creek track. Brett Roberts © Queensland Government
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Park Sundown
Traditional Owners Traditional Owners
Park Ranger Park Ranger

Venture along this picturesque creek-side trail and encounter figs, pittosporums and ooline, a medium to large tree with bright green leaves and rough, tile-patterned bark.

Imagine a time dating back 1.6 million years, when this now-vulnerable tree flourished in rainforests found across a much wetter Australia than today.

Watch for skinks and lizards scurrying into cracks and crevices in the rocks as you walk along Ooline Creek. Catch your breath at the cool rock pool before scrambling around the waterhole to explore more of the gorge.

At a glance

Distance: 4km return (start and finish points are the same and the traveller must return via the same path).
Time suggested: Allow 3–4hrs walking time.
Grade:
Journey type: Walk

Getting there and getting around

Ooline Creek track is in Sundown National Park, 250km (3–4hrs drive) south-west of Brisbane via Stanthorpe, and 70km north-west of Tenterfield.

  • The track begins at The Broadwater camping area at the southern end of the park.
  • Access to The Broadwater camping area is suitable for conventional vehicles.
  • From Stanthorpe drive along 76km of bitumen road via Texas Road (62km) and Glenlyon Dam Road (14km), followed by 4km of good gravel road (Permanents Road) to the park entrance.
  • From Tenterfield in New South Wales, travel north 5km along the New England Highway then west along the Bruxner Highway 52km to Mingoola. Turn right and travel 12km to the park turn-off.
  • From the park entrance, drive about 1.5km to The Broadwater camping area.

Road conditions

Parking

Park near the information hut at the eastern end of The Broadwater camping area.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available at Stanthorpe and Tenterfield. Limited fuel and supplies are available at Ballandean, Wallangarra and a small general store at Glenlyon Dam Tourist Park.

  • For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Wheelchair access

There are no wheelchair-accessible facilities.

When to visit

Opening hours

Ooline Creek track is open 24 hours a day.

Check park alerts for the latest information on access, closures and conditions.

Climate and weather

Sundown National Park is cooler than other parts of the 'Sunshine State'. Summer can be humid with daytime temperatures occasionally reaching 40°C, but winter nights can be cold and even frosty. The cooler months, from April to September, are the best times to visit.

Permits and fees

Organised events

  • If you are planning a school excursion or organising a group event such as a wedding, fun run or adventure training, you may need an organised event permit. Maximum group sizes and other conditions apply depending on location and activity type.

Pets

Domestic animals are not allowed here.

Staying in touch

Mobile phone coverage

None. Check with your service provider for more information.

Tourism information

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see Queensland.com, and for friendly advice on how to get there, where to stay and what to do, find your closest accredited visitor information centre.

Be prepared

  • Parks are natural environments and conditions can be unpredictable. You are responsible for your own safety and for looking after the park.
  • Read stay safe and visit with care for important general information about safety, caring for parks and essentials to bring when you visit Queensland’s national parks.

  • Read safety during extreme weather for important information about what to do during floods, bushfires and cyclones.

Drinking water

  • There is no drinking water along this track.
  • Drinking water is available from a tap near the park headquarters, near The Broadwater at the park's southern end. You will need to bring a container to carry it in.
  • Untreated water from creeks and waterholes is not suitable for drinking.
  • Avoid drinking water collected from creeks in the vicinity of the old mines.
  • Treat all water before use.

Rubbish

  • There are no bins. Take your rubbish with you when you leave.
  • Secure supplies and rubbish from goannas and currawongs.

Walking

  • Make sure you stay on the designated tracks; they lead you to some outstanding features without damaging the park.
  • Walking routes may be rough and traprock is extremely slippery when wet.
  • Read walk with care for tips on walking safely and walking lightly.

Around water

  • There may be leeches in the rock pools of Ooline Creek.
  • Check weather reports, water and river height information before heading to the park. River levels can rise rapidly after heavy rain and leave you stranded. There is no mobile phone reception and no help close at hand.
  • Never jump or dive into the creek or waterhole as it can be shallow and have submerged hazards.
  • Read water safety for important information about staying safe in and near water and caring for parks.
Last updated: 22 March 2018
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